NPARA Projects

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Objective: evaluate yield and quality of wheat varieties seeded at different seeding rates based on thousand kernel weight (TKW) in the Peace region

This research will build on previous research done in 2019, 2020, 2021 in the Peace region that evaluated the impact of seeding rate on crop yield, test weight and protein content on both AAC Brandon and AAC Connery. The study demonstrated that higher seeding rates (28 and 37 seeds foot-2), led to significantly higher yield and test weights on both varieties. However, the highest seeding rate (37 seeds foot-2) also had significantly lower protein content. Thus, we wish to evaluate two more commonly grown varieties grown in the Peace region (AAC Viewfield and AAC Redberry). AAC Redberry is not prevalent in the North Peace and Mackenzie regions, however it is early maturing (three days earlier than the AAC Brandon variety) and thus would likely be a good fit. AAC Wheatland VB was selected as it is a new midge tolerant variety with a similar maturity to AAC Brandon, and a slightly higher yield advantage of up to 4 bushels acre-1 (AFSC Yield Alberta 2021).

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Objective: investigate the effect of various forms of N-enhanced efficiency fertilizers in the development and yield of different varieties of wheat in the Peace region of Alberta

While yield production of spring wheat is improved by intensified agricultural strategies and novel genetic varieties, optimal soil N release and precise N uptake by crops is still an ambiguous question. At the Agriculture and Agri-food Canada in Lethbridge, Dr. Brian Beres has a research program evaluating different forms of fertilizers, designed to provide N availability to wheat crops better than N provided through banded Urea. This experiment focuses on exploring N-enhanced efficiency fertilizers (EEF) set at different rates and placed banded at different development stages. The goal is to observe if a certain EEF can improve overall yield.

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Allelopathy is the direct or indirect impact on plant individuals, whether they belong or not to the same species. Established as substances composed of secondary metabolites, allelopathy can a) affect growth and yield of another plant and b) develop autotoxicity, where plant individuals’ secrete chemicals that prevent propagation and development of seedlings of same species growth.
Allelopathy can be used as a strategic tool to mitigate chemical weed management. Residues of allelopathic cover crops not only provide benefits to the soil but also help to reduce weed populations during their growth and likely for the cash crops seeded in the season thereafter.

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The annual forage trials are performed every year to report yield and forage quality of several varieties at each trial type (alternative, oat varieties, and mixes such as spring and cereal and pulse and cereal). This is a project performed with sister associations such as Battle River Research Group (BRRG), Chinook Applied Research Association (CARA), Gateway Research Organization (GRO), Lakeland Agricultural Research Association (LARA), Mackenzie Agricultural Research Association (MARA), Peace Country Beef and Forage Association (PCBFA), and West Central Forage Association (WCFA).

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There were 14 Camelina varieties that were sown as a new trial at the North Peace Applied Research Farm. Since it is a relatively new crop alternative there is few choices for weed management. In the beginning of the trial weed grasses were promptly reduced with applications of Assure II (Quizalofop-p-ethyl) on June 2 and 15. There is still no registrations for broadleaf weed herbivoryicides, thus it was found that weed pressure in the camelina trial was very high which impacted camelina stand number and yield. Emergent values (P=0.0002) percentage of biomass ground cover (P<0.0001) and visual ratings assessing vigour (P=0.0200) differed across camelina varieties. Variety DH33 had the greatest number of individual stands and the greatest percentage cover compared to DHBC4-1/2 which produced the least amount of stands and similarly occupied less ground cover. Moreover, varieties such as WTCA, DH12, DHBC1 and WT43 stand counts as great as those found in DH33. Percentage cover statistically like DH33 was also found in DHB4-3/4, DHBC8, DHBC1, WT43, WT46-2, and WTCA varieties. None of these parameters translated into yield and instead there was no difference in overall pounds per acre (P=0.7256) and test weight (P=0.4370). In contrast camelina stands exhibiting more vigour were those from DHBC4-1/2 compared to WT46-2 and DH33 which were seen as weaker. Varieties like DH26, DH14, DH12 WTSU WTOM-1 looked as vigorous as DHBC4-1/2.This trial showed that more varieties need to be sown to see their development and consequent yielding to be considered a crop alternative in the Northern Peace region. This crop is in dire need to have approved registrations for broadleaf herbivoryicides, thus once this occurs it is possible camelina could be adopted by growers in the region.

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CWRS wheat
Emergence between AAC Brandon and CDC Silas was the same (P=0.0015). The other varieties had more emergence compared to the last mentioned but they were the same between each other. Yield (P=0.0641), test weight (P=0.7729), protein (P=0.7756) was the same across all treatments. Overall, differences among wheat varieties had no influence in yield, test weight or protein content.

CRS wheat
Emergence (P=0.0687), test weight (P=0.5102) and protein content (P=0.8404) were the same across all CPS varieties. Yield from AAC Foray UVB, AAC Goodwin, CS Accelerate and AAC Crossfield surpassed AAC Penhold by 44, 29, 41 and 37% respectively (P=0.0139). It can be argued that these varieties do provide superior yield, through there is no difference in yield between each other.